The Carnival tradition in northern Sardinia

In recent times, Carnival has been somewhat sacrificed, but let us not forget that there is also a great tradition in northern Sardinia: excellent sweets, costume parades and spectacular pariglie.

Today we talk about some of the most popular events in North Sardinia, at the most playful time of the year.

THE TEMPLE CARNIVAL: A GREAT ALLEGORICAL FESTIVAL

The Carnival of Tempio is one of the most famous in Sardinia. It has ancient origins and is strongly felt throughout Gallura.

The quaint and historic town of Tempio stops for a week during Lu Carrasciali, to make room for the big festivities and all the events: parades of floats, the trial and sentencing of King George, big masquerade balls.

THE GREAT PROTAGONIST: KING GIORGIO

King George is one of the great protagonists of Carnival. His name in Gallurese dialect is Ghjolghju Puntogliu.

The character is derived from a pagan deity to whom, since before the ancient Romans, rites and sacrifices were dedicated to obtain an abundant harvest.

During the week, His Majesty King George, celebrates his marriage to the daring commoner Mannena, who will give the king a son who will be King George for the following year's carnival.

For six days King George is honored and acclaimed, until Mardi Gras when he is burned at the stake as guilty of all the year's ills. The stake closes the carnival and metaphorically ends the winter period, burning all the troubles that have befallen the city.

THE OTHER MASKS

  • Mannena is the beautiful commoner who marries King George
  • Lu Traccogghju, a mix of animal and demonic spirit dragging animal skins and chains
  • The Reùla, a terrifying army of the dead
  • Su Linzolu Cupaltatu, women covered only by a sheet, unpredictable and irreverent.

THE MOUTH-WATERING DESSERTS

Carnival is the perfect opportunity to taste the fantastic sweets of Tempio's tradition: acciuleddi (braids of fried dough passed in honey and orange peels), uriglietti (fried violated dough, passed in honey and covered in sugar) and frisgioli longhi (long fritters). Impossible to resist!

Carnival streamers

Tempio Pausania, the city of stone

PENTOLACCIA ON HORSEBACK: TRADITION AND FUN

The Pentolaccia a Cavallo (Horse Pentolaccia) is a fun and spectacular festival held in Benetutti, an ancient town in Goceano.

THE KNIGHTS.

The Benetuttese Horse Pentolaccia involves groups of riders, dressed in carnival or traditional costumes; the riders compete in an exciting race carried out within the village circuit.

In the first phase, participants must try to hit and knock down terracotta pots placed along the track at two different stations.

THE SPECTACULAR PARADES

In the second stage, riders can ride the course in free mode, performing acrobatic games and tricks: the pariglie.
The course runs along the main street of the town of Benetutti, with a total length of about 400 meters.

The Benetuttese Horse Pentolaccia, by tradition, does not provide prizes or refunds for riders,
only the wish and hope that everything went as desired.
The day passes accompanied by the tastes and flavors of the Benetuttese tradition to end with a dinner of local delicacies.

BONORVA: A WEEK OF CELEBRATION AND FOLKLORE

The Bonorvese Carnival is one of the largest folkloric and cultural events in northern Sardinia. The events are spread over a week-long celebration of tradition, culture and fun.

The Bonorvian carnival has very old roots in local tradition. For one week the spirit of freedom and celebration takes over the town.
It begins with the accompaniment and installation of "Giolzi" and ends with his condemnation at the stake.

PARIGLIAS BONORVESAS

Pariglie are spectacular acrobatic equestrian races that close the carnival."S'Asone de Carrasegare"(the ringleader) kicks off the competition.
Where does the name come from?

In ancient times, farmers, for the cleaning and harvesting of grains, prepared threshing floors ("Sas Alzolas"), flat, clean spaces on which bundles of ears of grain were arranged.

In the center was a pole, "S'Asone," to which a lead horse was hitched, tied with a rope to the other horses that went around in circles, dragging basalt stone slabs to crush grain or other products.

A breathtaking spectacle!

Bonorvian marriages

cover the variety of traditional Sardinian dances

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